Congratulations to winners of the Outstanding Symposium Research to Practice Award!

2020: Sandra J. Huston

The 2020 award goes to Sandra J. Huston, PhD for “Using Research to Inform and Enhance Financial Learning Practices.”

Using a variety of personal finance, economic, and pedagogical theories, along with research findings from previous studies, several quasi-experimental and descriptive studies have been conducted to test hypotheses designed to establish evidence-based financial education (specifically financial learning) practices. These research studies have been conducted over the past three years in collaboration with a college-level personal finance education program at a large university in the south-central region of the United States. Over 20 instructors and 3000 students were involved in this collaboration for data collection to support this research.

2019: Kristy Archuleta, Joy Clady, Christina Glenn, Danah Jeong, & Derek Lawson

The 2019 award goes to Kristy Archuleta and Danah Jeong, University of Georgia; Joy Clady and Derek Lawson, Kansas State University; and Christina Glenn, Fort Hays State University for “Can Money Habitudes Make a Difference? An experiment to bridge research and practice.”

The purpose of this research was to examine if a tool used in practice – Money Habitudes – could make a difference in a number of personal domains of one’s life – including financial behaviors, financial anxiety, relationship satisfaction, similar money goals and values, couple communication with money, and financial cognitions. The results indicated that playing online Money Habitudes improved a number of financial domains.

2019: Kristy Archuleta, Joy Clady, Christina Glenn, Danah Jeong, & Derek Lawson

The 2019 award goes to Kristy Archuleta and Danah Jeong, University of Georgia; Joy Clady and Derek Lawson, Kansas State University; and Christina Glenn, Fort Hays State University for “Can Money Habitudes Make a Difference? An experiment to bridge research and practice.”

The purpose of this research was to examine if a tool used in practice – Money Habitudes – could make a difference in a number of personal domains of one’s life – including financial behaviors, financial anxiety, relationship satisfaction, similar money goals and values, couple communication with money, and financial cognitions. The results indicated that playing online Money Habitudes improved a number of financial domains.

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