Congratulations to winners of the Outstanding Symposium Research to Practice Award!

2021: Joyce Serido and Sharon Powell

The 2021 award goes to Joyce Serido and Sharon Powell for “Make Money Make $ense.”

In this research-to-practice forum, we demonstrate how to use a 10-lesson youth financial activity toolkit to encourage positive financial socialization. Each activity focuses on a specific financial topic (e.g., values, smart shopping, saving, goal setting) framed in the context of experiences that youth encounter. Each activity provides opportunities for supportive adults to engage youth in making financial choices. We describe the collaborative process used to develop the toolkit and to validate the activities. In addition, we provide examples of how we adapted the activities for use in multiple settings and across different age groups.

Joyce Serido, University of Minnesota and Sharon Powell, University of Minnesota ExtensionM

2020: Sandra J. Huston

The 2020 award goes to Sandra J. Huston, PhD for “Using Research to Inform and Enhance Financial Learning Practices.”

Using a variety of personal finance, economic, and pedagogical theories, along with research findings from previous studies, several quasi-experimental and descriptive studies have been conducted to test hypotheses designed to establish evidence-based financial education (specifically financial learning) practices. These research studies have been conducted over the past three years in collaboration with a college-level personal finance education program at a large university in the south-central region of the United States. Over 20 instructors and 3000 students were involved in this collaboration for data collection to support this research.

2019: Kristy Archuleta, Joy Clady, Christina Glenn, Danah Jeong, & Derek Lawson

The 2019 award goes to Kristy Archuleta and Danah Jeong, University of Georgia; Joy Clady and Derek Lawson, Kansas State University; and Christina Glenn, Fort Hays State University for “Can Money Habitudes Make a Difference? An experiment to bridge research and practice.”

The purpose of this research was to examine if a tool used in practice – Money Habitudes – could make a difference in a number of personal domains of one’s life – including financial behaviors, financial anxiety, relationship satisfaction, similar money goals and values, couple communication with money, and financial cognitions. The results indicated that playing online Money Habitudes improved a number of financial domains.

2019: Kristy Archuleta, Joy Clady, Christina Glenn, Danah Jeong, & Derek Lawson

The 2019 award goes to Kristy Archuleta and Danah Jeong, University of Georgia; Joy Clady and Derek Lawson, Kansas State University; and Christina Glenn, Fort Hays State University for “Can Money Habitudes Make a Difference? An experiment to bridge research and practice.”

The purpose of this research was to examine if a tool used in practice – Money Habitudes – could make a difference in a number of personal domains of one’s life – including financial behaviors, financial anxiety, relationship satisfaction, similar money goals and values, couple communication with money, and financial cognitions. The results indicated that playing online Money Habitudes improved a number of financial domains.

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